Francesco Zanot embraces diaristic photography for Fondazione Prada’s first exhibition of Osservatorio

 Melanie Bonajo, Thank You for Hurting Me I Really Needed It, 2008-2016. Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, Courtesy of Fondazione Prada -  https://bit.ly/2IMeVYS

Melanie Bonajo, Thank You for Hurting Me I Really Needed It, 2008-2016. Photo: Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti, Courtesy of Fondazione Prada - https://bit.ly/2IMeVYS

“Give Me Yesterday” explores different diaristic approaches in photography. It’s an exhibition on personal life and its artistic representation. Why did you choose this subject as the first one of Osservatorio?
Photography is a pervasive medium. It’s a language that can be adopted into various fields and contexts, such as science, archive, personal memories, social networks, art… It was important to start with an exhibition which in some way reflected this occurrence, because many different uses and functions of photography are hybridizing with each other more and more in recent years. In this case the works of 14 photographers are exhibited. They are all artists, but they often include in their images some aesthetic codes and/or narrative strategies deducted from some social uses of the same language. The increasing number of pictures taken every single day are now personal and family shots to be shared on digital platforms. They are much more than war or commercial photographs. So it was crucial to explore the theme of diaristic photography in the last period through the eyes of some artists who used it for their projects.

Whilst thinking about this idea of the diary photograph, the way we record our daily lives to construct memories, and how these images or the private are immediately made public through Instagram, I was interested to see from a curators point of view the way different photographers use aesthetic codes and narrative strategies to deliver their personal aesthetic. Something I am continuing to read about and digest within thinking about my own practise.